The start . . .

So this was it . . . 12 weeks in training school and I was behind the wheel of Ambulance about to set off on my first blue call as a driver. The job was a 30 year old with chest pain.  My mind raced.  Chest pain?!!  This could be my first Myocardial Infarction (Heart Attack)!!!

We are given three weeks of driver training covering some advanced techniques but sadly we are not allowed to practice driving in London on blue lights.  Your only practice time is when you do it for real.  Very scary.

My heart pounded and my knuckles tightened round the wheel.  I took a deep breath and pressed the button for the blue lights and sirens to operate . . . and then we were off.  The medic sitting in the passenger seat beside me sprung to life and pointed manically to the middle of the road, “Go that way! Dominate the road! DOMINATE!  DOMINATE!”.  I did as he said and like the parting of the Red Sea, the general mass of traffic seemed to move out of our way allowing us to race through . . . apart from the occasional driver – who didn’t!!

. . . first time on blue lightsOn the radio, Apache Indian’s “Boom Shakala” started playing.  The medic leant forward, cranked it up to full volume, placed on his aviators, wound down the window and both he and the tech in the back started dancing and singing in unison . . . . . this was all a little surreal for my first time driving on blue lights.  And as we raced toward what I believed was a patient on the verge of dying*, I was suddenly hit by an overwhelming realisation that working for the Ambulance service wasn’t going to be quite as I imagined . . . . .

Binder

*he wasn’t and didn’t

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One thought on “The start . . .

  1. Too true sir, my first Blue light run was pretty much the same – still loving it 2 years later. Good luck with the Blog and the job, and remember; it’s a tough job but someone has to do it 😉

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