Two different days – Part 2

This day was, in all aspects of our job, a normal day.

Day 2 – fun filled day of not so proper jobs

Job 1)  Two year old with a high temperature.  No Calpol in the house and the young child was wrapped up for winter.  The family lived 500m away from the hospital and unsurprisingly, Dad chose to follow on in their car.

Job 2)  The job came down as 57 year old with chest pain.  But on arrival we were presented with a ‘drunk’ 57 year old with no chest pain – outside a betting shop . . . 500m from the same hospital in the opposite direction.  He said his walking stick had been stolen and was kicking up a fuss.  We don’t know where the “chest pain” had come from but had a sneaking suspicion that the betting shop used it to get us there quickly!
He demanded to go to hospital to get another stick.

Job 3)  A 40 year old man who had a car knock the back of their legs.  Basically, they were cleaning the rear window of their car when another gentleman went to start his car behind them.  Forgetting it was still in gear the car jolted forward hitting the man’s legs.
There was no loss of consciousness, no bones broken, no cuts and no bruising.  In fact there wasn’t a mark on the man – but he was insisting that we massage his leg better.  After politely refusing we left him in the community with “good advice”.

Job 4)  3 year old slipped whilst dancing in the living room.  They glanced their face on a cabinet on the way down just ever so grazing the skin on their forehead.  The kid had burst into tears immediately.
Checking the patient over we could see that the graze was about a quarter of a centimetre long and hadn’t shed any blood.  After calming both the child and parent we left them at home – with “good advice”.

Job 5)  18 year old having a subtle anxiety attack after smoking cannabis.  Calmed and left with sister –  with “good advice”.

Job 6)  A 33 year teacher with a gradual onset of a headache.  No vomiting, no dizziness, no joint pains, no fever – just a headache . . . and a desire to go to hospital.

Job 7)  35 year old woman unresponsive in the back of a taxi . . . outside her house.  On arrival the woman was indeed unresponsive – or rather drunk and asleep in the back of the taxi . . . outside her house.  So, after a few shakes and shouts the patient awoke, was apologetic and was helped to their front door where and even more apologetic husband was waiting.  Bless.

Job 8 )  30 year old woman unresponsive in street.  Upon arrival the said woman was awake and drunk, also admitting to taking cocaine – however, a long time earlier.  She was within 100 yards of a well known night club and had come out for some fresh air.
After all our checks she agreed she wanted to go home to South London and insisted we take her, saying that we had nothing better to do in our job.  After informing her politely that we were not in fact, a taxi service and would not be escorting her home at the cost of the British tax payer she started to sulk.  I did however, talk with the night club bouncers who arranged a taxi for her and we waved goodbye as she was driven off.

This rounded off our day as a perfectly timed off-job.  Pretty standard day as most would agree.  But as stated in the previous post we had some interesting news delivered to us by a night turn crew.  They stepped up to us when we were dropping off our teacher with the headache.

Crew:     “Was it you guys on that job yesterday with that chap who was refusing to go to hospital?”
Binder:  “The old chap in the nursing home?”
Crew:     “Aye, that’s him.  We went to him in the early hours of this morning”
Binder:  “How was he?”
Crew:     “Dead.  We found him kneeling beside his bed, just starting to stiffen up”
Binder:  “Oh”

There was less than eight hours from when we’d seen him to when this crew had found him and he had already started to go into rigormortis.

The sly old bugger – I thought – he knew!  He bloody knew.

Binder

 

Facebook Twitter Email Stumbleupon Pinterest Delicious

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *